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AUTO INSURANCE: WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED

AUTO INSURANCE: WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED With all of the money spent on TV advertising by auto insurers these days,…

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Pet Trusts: How to Care for Your Pet After Your Death

For many pet-owners, their pets are family. Or, in the case of real estate and hotel magnate Leona Helmsley, more…

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UNDUE INFLUENCE: DO YOU FEEL LEFT OUT?

UNDUE INFLUENCE: DO YOU FEEL LEFT OUT? Dad died ten years ago. Mom’s been in good health until the last…

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Divorce: Do It Alone or Hire an Attorney?

So your marriage is failing and you’re asking yourself: “What do I do now?” The first question to tackle is…

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The Issues with Dying Without a Will

April 21st marked the three-year anniversary of Prince’s death, and the battle over his estate continues. While there would have…

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Employers must comply with FCRA or face penalties

Starbucks was recently hit with two major class-action lawsuits claiming it repeatedly violated the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA). The lawsuits allege that Starbucks obtained background reports on thousands of job applicants which contained inaccurate information, then failed to give those applicants an opportunity to review or correct those errors before denying employment.

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Trusts an important tool in estate planning

In many ways, wills and trusts are not all that different. Both are legal documents that can be used to direct what happens to your money and property when you die. However, a trust can do much more than a will. For example, special needs trusts can be used to preserve money that will supplement the needs of a disabled family member without making that person ineligible for public benefits.

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Avoid probate with estate planning

Many people have a will that directs who is supposed to get their property when they die, but very few people are familiar with the process. Contrary to popular belief, the person you name in your will to administer your estate (called a personal representative) cannot automatically access your accounts or start distributing property. He or she must first start a probate.

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