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Steppin’ Out in Pink

One of our charity events for our 100th year anniversary “year of giving back” to the community will be Steppin’…

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Moon Tunes

Hale Skemp is sponsoring Moon Tunes on Saturday, Sept. 7. The Woodstock event is from 1:30 to 9 p.m.  All…

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Riverfest Lunch

Hale Skemp annually takes lunch at La Crosse’s Riverfest along the Mississippi River. The firm enjoyed local food and live…

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Alumni Party

As a part of Hale Skemp’s 100 year anniversary celebration, the firm held an alumni party for all past and…

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Neighbors Day

Hale Skemp volunteered for Neighbors Day 2019 in La Crosse. Firm members braved rain and assisted elderly and disabled La…

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APTIV Fundraiser

Hale Skemp participated in Aptiv’s “Game-On!” on March 22, 2019 in an effort to raise money for people with disabilities.…

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Employers must comply with FCRA or face penalties

Starbucks was recently hit with two major class-action lawsuits claiming it repeatedly violated the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA). The lawsuits allege that Starbucks obtained background reports on thousands of job applicants which contained inaccurate information, then failed to give those applicants an opportunity to review or correct those errors before denying employment.

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Trusts an important tool in estate planning

In many ways, wills and trusts are not all that different. Both are legal documents that can be used to direct what happens to your money and property when you die. However, a trust can do much more than a will. For example, special needs trusts can be used to preserve money that will supplement the needs of a disabled family member without making that person ineligible for public benefits.

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Avoid probate with estate planning

Many people have a will that directs who is supposed to get their property when they die, but very few people are familiar with the process. Contrary to popular belief, the person you name in your will to administer your estate (called a personal representative) cannot automatically access your accounts or start distributing property. He or she must first start a probate.

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